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PostPosted: Thu Mar 14, 2019 11:21 pm 
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If this is a repeat topic, I apologize. Maybe Voronwë can move the post there, if so. Otherwise...

We've all felt culture shock from time to time. Sometimes we react with 'don't ever let that be part of my culture!' But sometimes we wish it was!!. I ran across this article which briefly touches on the way Inuit children are raised to deal with anger, and how their culture as a result is one in which emotions are controlled into adulthood. I really wanted to share it here

How Inuit Parents Teach Kids To Control Their Anger

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 16, 2019 12:18 am 
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Elengil, I really enjoyed reading that article. The principle is shared with the positive discipline tenet as well, but it’s amazing if the entire culture follows it!

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 21, 2019 9:39 pm 
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Here's a follow up on that original story. I'm glad for this one because I was wondering how a person not raised with the same Inuit sensibilities would attempt to implement their teaching. I wasn't sure if it really needed "the whole village" to make it work, or if children already not being raised that way could learn to respond to a new approach.

https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2019/03/21/702209976/can-inuit-moms-help-me-tame-my-3-year-olds-anger

But I think part of what it really drove home was that we are innately storytelling beings! We respond to stories, even if we don't believe them, we want to hear them, we want to imagine them, we want to tell them!

It is pushing me more and more to try to explain to myself why I'm still not writing mine! And of course, the answer is starting to become "I don't know why!" Which means I'd better get my butt in gear!

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 22, 2019 6:06 pm 
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Didn't think this really warranted its own thread so using this one as it sort of fits.

https://www.archaeology-world.com/celtic-woman-found-buried-inside-a-tree-wearing-fancy-clothes-and-jewellery-after-2200-years/

Was reading the above (which is fascinating) but it got me thinking, where is the line between archaeology and grave desecration? I don't mean arguing the distinction between carefully excavating, documenting, and researching graves vs straight up grave robbing.

I mean, how old does a grave have to be before it's considered fair game for research? How would any of us feel about archaeologists going into cemeteries and digging up graves? How old is old enough? 100 years? 200? Does it have to be an unknown grave vs. a marked one? What about tombs?

And if we attempt to set a distinction, are we going to apply it consistently or will we always try to explain why this one is okay to dig up, because of XYZ reason...?

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 22, 2019 9:21 pm 
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From what I understand, it's a big question in archeology.

It is possible that I understand it because of Nicky Bliss, Mrs. Emerson's delightful pen sister.

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 23, 2019 12:36 am 
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Vicky Bliss?

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 23, 2019 5:55 am 
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Yeah, her. :D

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 23, 2019 1:17 pm 
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I can understand bringing up bodies and graves that are stumbled across and would be destroyed otherwise - like when they're doing construction work or something. I think that was the case in the article I linked. And there was another tomb just recently uncovered in China under similar circumstances. It just got me thinking about all those dodgy gray areas, too.

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 23, 2019 4:06 pm 
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The Kennewick man:
https://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch ... nally-over

The Native Americans who were related to him fought to get him reburied and it looks like they've won.


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 25, 2019 4:45 am 
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The Inuit articles were fascinating. We have new neighbors who built a house across the street. It's been an empty lot for the 30 years we've lived here & the new neighbors have 3 children in the 8-9 year age range. The parents are constantly swearing & yelling at them. It's rather unnerving. I cannot help but wonder what it will be like when they are 12, 16, or 18.

The question of the Celtic woman and Kennewick man is rather interesting. I realize some may feel my take on the subject is not respectful, but .. what a wonderful legacy/heritage to be able to pass along when one can no longer speak for themselves! The Kennewick man would likely have soon been lost entirely, swept away in a river. I understand the respect due, but I dunno, a proper reburial/return to ancestral lands after being studied?

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 26, 2019 2:20 pm 
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My family tree goes back 13 generations in America on one branch, complete with identified grave sites and headstones for many of them. I would feel a little uncomfortable if someone, in the name of curiosity or Science, decided to dig up those family plots to examine the bones, put them in a storage unit, and place any surviving jewelry into display cases. Or worse, bulldozed up and sent to the garbage dump. When they were lovingly buried, their kin were not expecting that kind of future for them. Likewise with another branch of my family that does not have a written history and routinely gets dug up, stuck in a box, and studied. I realize they are just bones, yet it feels disrespectful to disturb them. Like defacing a piece of art in a temple that may have no meaning for the disrupter but great meaning to the people long ago who first expressed it.

As for saving a burial site about to be washed away or bulldozed away (as often happens in our city, built on the homes of mound builders) it is respectful to rebury them nearby, and to notify a representative of the extended family.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 26, 2019 2:49 pm 
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Kennewick man was found on the bank of the Columbia River. Those who found him presumed there had been a murder and that is when the investigation started. Everyone was surprised when they discovered how old he was. The bones could never have been 'returned' if they had not been identified. This was not the case of a desecrated grave a few hundred years old. He is believed believed to have lived 9,000 years ago.

Narya, I understand and respect your point of view. It is a valid one. There are far fewer remains/burial sites in the Americas than there are in other parts of the world. I would imagine that it's nearly impossible in some places for the living to continue living (build homes, plant crops, etc..) that would not disturb those who came before.

Is paleontology/the study of ancient human life inappropriate in all cases? I would imagine many grave sites, especially very old ones in which it would take a specialist to recognize and make sense of what remains, have been unknowingly disturbed and built, plowed, or paved over.

*edited to add. I have ancestors with identified graves in America that date back to the 1630's. Assuming a generation is roughly 25 years that would be about 15 generations. Kennewick man would have had at least 360 generations (possibly far more depending depending upon the average age of a 'generation'). The Celtic woman is much 'younger' at 2,200 years. Should that matter? I do not intend to be disrespectful .. just curious. I kinda look at it as another way of earlier generations ('elders') being able to continue telling us their story from which we can learn.

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